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For Children's Social Workers

 
Introduction   For Children's Social Workers  Youth   Parents/Caregivers   Financial Aid/Scholarships   A-G Requirements

You can make much more money by earning a college degree.
The data shows that a college degree correlates directly to your salary range—and the relationship between compensation and education level is becoming even more prominent.
At the turn of the 20th century, American working life was different. Only a minority of adults had a high school diploma. But by 1975, full-time workers with a Bachelor's degree had 1.5 times the annual earnings of workers with a high school diploma. By 1999, this ratio had edged up to 1.8. As our society has continued to evolve, education has become the optimal route to professional success: pursuing a degree is the best way to receive training, to gain expertise in a given field, and even to guide you and help you make choices about your career.

Today, a formal, focused education is an essential ingredient. Employers have increasingly used diplomas and degrees as a way to screen applicants. And once you’ve landed the job you want, your salary will reflect your credentials. On average, a person with a Master's degree earns $31,900 more per year than a high school graduate—a difference of as much as 105%!

Average Annual Earnings for College Graduates and Non-Graduates

Degree Earned Salary
Professional Degree $109,600
Doctoral Degree $89,400
Master's Degree $62,300
Bachelor's Degree $52,200
Associates Degree $38,200
Some College $36,800
High School Graduate $30,400
Some High School $23,400

Average Lifetime Earnings—Different Levels of Education.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Surveys, March 1998, 1999, and 2000.

Making a Lifetime of Difference.
By the time you comfortably retire, you’ll look back and see that your earnings increase, as figured by your level of education, has compounded over your lifetime.
A person with a Bachelor's degree will earn, on average, almost twice as much as workers with a high school diploma over a lifetime ($2.1 million compared to $1.2 million). This is a result of not only higher starting salaries for people with higher education levels, but also the sharper earnings growth over the course their careers.

Work-Life Earnings for Full-Time Employees (in $ millions)

Degree Earned Salary in Millions
Professional Degree $4.40
Doctoral Degree $3.40
Master's Degree $2.50
Bachelor's Degree $2.10
Associates Degree $1.60
Some College $1.50
High School Graduate $1.20
Some High School $1.00

Average Lifetime Earnings—Different Levels of Education.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Surveys, March 1998, 1999, and 2000.

Frequently asked questions for CSWs:

Question: How do I help my client who is behind in high school credits graduate or obtain a GED?

Answer: Night school, Adult school, Summer school, Continuance school. It depends on school district, CSW should contact child’s previous school for the best options for the student.

Question: How do I help my client with a disability get into college?

Answer: Each college/university has to make all reasonable accommodations under ADA law. The student must make a self disclosure at the students with disabilities office. Student can take IEP document to college as proof of existing disability.

Question: What do I do if my client is a high school drop out and wants to get back in school? If 17 and under? If over 18?

Answer: Varies by school district. If the child is 17 the school can not reject the student’s enrollment. If the student is 18 years old older, the s/he will have to attend adult school, continuance school or enroll at a local community college.